Jayeon (Janey) Lee

Assistant Professor
206 Coppee Hall
610-758-6305
jayeon.lee@lehigh.edu
Ph.D., The Ohio State University
Communication, social media, visual communication, journalism, political communication, persuasion, research methods

Jayeon “Janey” Lee earned her doctorate (PHD) of communication at The Ohio State University, her Master’s degree (MA) in journalism at the University of Texas-Austin, and her Bachelor of Laws degree (LLB) from Korea University. Prior to joining Lehigh, Lee was a staff writer at The Chosunilbo, a national newspaper in South Korea; and guest TV and radio reporter for multiple national media outlets including SBS. She has published in journals such as Computer-mediated Communication, Communication Monographs, and Mass Communication & Society, and presented at many national and international conferences. Her research and teaching interests revolve around social media and new technology, particularly users' impression formation and strategic self-presentation on social media in the context of political communication and journalism.

Publications

Lee, J. & Song, H.(in press). Why people post news on social networking sites: A focus on technology adoption, media bias, and partisanship strength. Electronic News.

Lee, J. & Pingree. R. J. (2016). Cues about cues in politicians’ social media profiles: Effects of commenters’ attractiveness and claims of cognitive effort. The Journal of Social Media in Society, 5(3), 92-120.

Lee, J. & Lim, Y. (2016). Gendered campaign tweets: The case of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. Public Relations Review42(5), 849-855.

Lee, J. (2016). The development and changes of communication research (written in Korean). In K. H. Lee (Ed.), Hyundai Motor Art (pp. 10-19). Seoul: South Korea: ENArt.

Lee, J. (2016). Interview: Visual communication (written in Korean). In K. H. Lee (Ed.), Hyundai Motor Art (pp. 20-27). Seoul: South Korea: ENArt.

Lee, J. (2016). Presidents' visual presentations in their official photos: A cross-cultural analysis of the US and South Korea. Cogent Arts & Humanities, 3(1), 1–14.

Lee, J. (2016). Opportunity or risk? How news organizations frame social media in their guidelines for journalists. The Communication Review, 19(2), 106–127.

Lee, J. & Myers, T. A.(2016). Can social media change your mind? SNS use, cross-cutting exposure and discussion, and political view change. Journal of Social Media Studies, 2(2), 87–97.

Lee, J. (2015). The double-edged sword: The Effects of journalists’ social media activities on audience perceptions of journalists and their news products. Journal of Computer-mediated Communication, 20(3), 312–329.

Lee, J. (2014). Are some people less influenced by others’ opinions? The role of internal political self-efficacy and need for cognition in impression formation on SNS. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 17(9), 571–577.

Holbert, R. L., Hill, M., & Lee, J. (2014). The political relevance of entertainment media. In C. Reinemann (Ed.), Handbooks of Communication Science, 17: Political Communication. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton.

Lee, J. & Lim, Y. (2014). Who says what about whom? Young voters' impression formation of political candidates on social-networking sites. Mass Communication & Society, 17(4), 553-572.

Holbert, R. L., Lee, J., Esralew, S., Walther, W. O., Hmielowski, J. D., & Landreville, K. D. (2013). Affinity for political humor: An assessment of internal factor structure, reliability, and validity. Humor: International Journal of Humor Research, 26(4), 551-572.

Lee, J. (2013). “You know how tough I am?” Discourse analysis of U. S. Midwestern Congresswomen's self-presentation. Discourse & Communication, 7(3), 299–317.

Hmielowski, J. D., Holbert, R. L., & Lee, J. (2011). Predicting the consumption of political TV satire: Affinity for political humor, The Daily Show and The Colbert Report. Communication Monographs, 78(1), 96–114.

Honors and Awards

Mellon Digital Humanities Initiative Travel Grant 2016 ($2,650)       
        Mellon Digital Humanities Initiative, Lehigh University 

Paul J. Franz, Jr. Summer Research Grant 2016 ($2,000)        
        The Paul J. Franz, Jr. and Class of 1968 Junior Faculty Fellowships, Lehigh University, College of Arts and Sciences

Travel Grant for conference presentation 
        Lehigh University, Provost’s Office, 2017, 2016, 2015
        College of Arts and Sciences, 2014, 2013

Paul J. Franz, Jr. Summer Research Grant 2014 ($4,000)   
        The Paul J. Franz, Jr. and Class of 1968 Junior Faculty Fellowships, Lehigh University, College of Arts and Sciences 

Top 3 Student Paper Award      
        International Communication Association 2013, Journalism Studies Division 

Top 3 Oral Presentation Award      
        The Edward F. Hayes Graduate Research Forum 2013, The Ohio State University, Social and Behavioral Sciences division

Top 4 Student Paper Award       
        International Communication Association 2008, Mass Communication Division   

P.E.O. International Peace Scholarship ($8,000 x 2)      
        The P.E.O. International Scholarship Fund

The Honor Society of Kappa Tau Alpha      
        University of Texas

The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi       
        University of Texas

Ada Frances Miller Fellowship        
        University of Texas, School of Journalism       
 
Publisher’s Award for Excellence in Reporting    
        The Chosunilbo

Mansong Honor Student Scholarship     
        Korea University, College of Law

Media Attention

Pacific Standard: "What's missing in Trump's tweets" (September 30, 2016)
         http://psmag.com/whats-missing-in-trump-s-tweets-10b1306bda9d#.ceo4c7igr

Mashable: "Trump tweets are 4 times more likely to 'mock or criticize' than Clinton's, study says" (September 29, 2016)
         http://mashable.com/2016/09/28/trump-tweets-more-likely-to-mock-criticiz...

The San Diego Union-Tribune: "Reporters’, editors’ opinions should stay off social media" (August 12, 2016)
         http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/opinion/readers-rep/sdut-social-medi...

Journalism Reserch News: "Article: News organizations frame social media as a risk" (May 19, 2016)
         http://journalisresearchnews.org/articl-news-organizations-frame-social-...

The Asian Age: "Fighting on Facebook isn’t a total waste of time” (February 21, 2016)
        http://www.asianage.com/life-and-style/fighting-facebook-isn-t-total-was...

Refinery29: "Facebook may be able to change political opinions” (February 20, 2016)
        http://www.refinery29.com/2016/02/103683/social-media-political-opinons-...

Bustle: "Social media has the power to change your mind, says study, but will you let it?” (February 19, 2016)
        http://www.bustle.com/articles/143048-social-media-has-the-power-to-chan...

New York Magazine Science of Us: “Sometimes social media can change minds” (February 17, 2016)   
        http://nymag.com/scienceofus/2016/02/sometimes-social-media-can-change-m...

Harvard University Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics, and Public Policy. Journalists' Resources: "What audiences think of journalists' social media use" (Oct 3, 2015)    
        http://journalistsresource.org/studies/society/news-media/audience-perce...

The American Press Institute: “Readers have mixed feelings about journalists interacting on Facebook” (June 1, 2015)    
        http://www.americanpressinstitute.org/publications/research-review/mixed...

PBS MediaShift; Daily Must-reads (June 1, 2015)    
        http://www.pbs.org/mediashift/2015/06/daily-must-reads-june-1-2015/

Conference Presentations

Lee, J. & Xu, W. (2017, May). Presidential candidates’ agenda building on Twitter: What issues and Tweet types received more retweets and favorites. International Communication Association, San Diego, CA.

Lee, J. & Holbert, R. L. (2016, June). Friending journalists: Journalists’ social media activities and viewers’ behavioral intention. International Communication Association, Fukuoka, Japan.

Lee, J. & Lim, Y. (2016, June). Gendered campaign tweets: The cases of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. International Communication Association, Fukuoka, Japan.

Lee, J. (2016, June). Opportunity or risk? How news organizations frame social media in their guidelines for journalists. International Communication Association, Fukuoka, Japan.

Lee, J. & Holbert, R. L. (2016, June). Friending journalists: Journalists’ social media activities and viewers’ behavioral intention. International Communication Association, Fukuoka, Japan.

Lee, J. & Lim, Y. (2016, June). Gendered campaign tweets: The cases of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. International Communication Association, Fukuoka, Japan.

Lee, J. (2015, May). Presidents’ visual self-presentations in their photos: A cross-cultural analysis of the U.S and South Korea. International Communication Association, San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Lee, J. (2014, August). Can social media change your mind? SNS use, cross-cutting exposure and discussion, and political view change. Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Chicago, IL.

Lee, J. & Pingree, R. (2014, August). Cues about cues in politicians’ social media profiles: Effects of commenters’ attractiveness and claims of cognitive effort. Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Chicago, IL.

Lee, J. (2014, May). The Effects of journalists’ social media activities on audience perceptions of journalists and their news products. International Communication Association, Seattle, WA.

Lee, J. & Song, H. (2013, June). An assessment of why people post news through social networking sites: A focus on technology adoption, media bias, and partisanship strength. International Communication Association, London, UK. *Top 3 Student Paper Awarded. Journalism Studies Division

Lee, J.  (2013, June). Are some people less influenced by others’ comments? The role of need for cognition and internal political self-efficacy in impression formation. International Communication Association, London, UK. 

Lee, J. (2013, March). Cue-taking dynamics in impression formation in the impression formation processes on Facebook. The 27th Annual Edward F. Hayes Graduate Research Forum, The Ohio State University. *Top 3 Oral Presentation Awarded. Social and Behavioral Sciences Division

Lee, J. & Lim, Y. (2012, August). Who says what about whom: Cue-taking dynamics in the impression formation processes on political candidates’ Facebook profiles. Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Chicago, IL.

Lee, J. (2012, May). “You know how tough I am?” Discourse analysis of U. S. Midwestern congresswomen’s self-presentation. International Communication Association, Phoenix, AZ.

Holbert, R. L., Esralew, S., Lee, J., & Walther, W. O. (2011, November). Affinity for political humor: An assessment of internal factor structure and reliability. National Communication Association, New Orleans, LA.

Hmielowski, J.D., Holbert, R.L., & Lee, J. (2010, November). Predicting the consumption of political TV satire: Affinity for political humor, The Daily Show and The Colbert Report. National Communication Association, San Francisco, CA.

Lee, J. (2009, August). Look who’s talking! Candidates’ self-presentation on campaign websites and viability in 2006 U.S. Sanate, House, and Gubernatorial races. Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Boston, MA.

Hyun, K, & Lee, J. (2008, May). The role of issue capacity in agenda setting: 2000 U.S. presidential election survey, International Communication Association, Montreal, Canada. *Top 4 Student Paper Awarded. Mass Communication Division

Courses Currently Taught

Comm30: Media & Society

J24: Visual Communication

J325: Political Communication

 

© IMRC CAS 2016

Department of Journalism and Communications  |  Coppee Hall  |  33 Coppee Drive  |  Bethlehem, PA 18015  |  phone 610-758-4180  |  fax 610-758-6198