Haiyan Jia

Assistant Professor
610-758-5365
haiyan.jia@lehigh.edu
Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University
Communication Technology, Data Journalism

Haiyan Jia is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Journalism and Communication and the Data X Initiative (http://www.lehigh.edu/datax).

Jia earned her doctorate in mass communications at the Pennsylvania State University, and bachelor’s in atmospheric sciences at Peking University in China. Before joining Lehigh’s Data X Digital Media faculty, Jia served as a post-doctoral scholar in the College of Information Sciences and Technology at Penn State.

Because of her background, her current work is very interdisciplinary--her research draws from various fields and domains including mass communication, media effects, psychology, sociology, human-computer interaction, and information science.

Specifically, her primary research interest focuses on the psychological and social effects of communication technology, ranging from the Internet and social media to robots and the Internet of Things. Jia also investigates the social and collective aspects of privacy in an increasingly technology-rich world.

Jia has published her work in Communication Research, Human-Computer Interaction, and in numerous conference proceedings publications such as the ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI) and the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW).

She teaches data journalism and data visualization, with an emphasis on the role of technology in reshaping the landscape of journalism, transforming readership, and enabling and empowering the new generation of journalists and citizens.

PUBLICATION

Jia, H., & Xu, H. (2016). Measuring individuals’ concerns over collective privacy on social networking sites. Cyberpsychology: Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, 10(1), article 1. doi: 10.5817/CP2016-1-4.

Jia, H., & Xu, H. (2016). Autonomous and interdependent: Collaborative privacy management on social network sites. Proceedings of the 2016 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI’16), San Jose, CA.

Jang, J. Y., Han, K., Lee, D., Jia, H., & Shih, P. (2016). Teens engage more with fewer photos: Temporal and comparative analysis on behaviors in Instagram. Proceeding of the 27th ACM Conference on Hypertext and Social Media, Halifax, Canada.

Jia, H., & Xu, H. (2015). Big social data: New challenges to information privacy. Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Knowledge Management (ICKM’15), Osaka, Japan.

Xu, H., & Jia, H. (2015). Privacy in a networked world. New challenges and opportunities for privacy research. Journal of the Washington Academy of Sciences, 101(3), 73-84.

Wisniewski, P., Jia, H., Xu, H., Rosson, M. B., & Carroll, J. M. (2015). Resilience mitigates the negative effects of adolescent Internet addiction and online risk exposure. Proceedings of the 2015 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI’15), Seoul, South Korea, June 2015. [SIGCHI “Best of CHI” Best Paper Award]

Jia, H., Wisniewski, P., Xu, H., Rosson, M.B., & Carroll, J.M. (2015). Risk-taking as a learning process for shaping teen’s online information privacy behaviors. Proceedings of the 2015 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW 2015), Vancouver, BC, Canada, March 2015.

Wisniewski, P., Jia, H., Xu, H., Rosson, M. B., & Carroll, J. M. (2015). “Preventative” vs. “reactive:” How parental mediation influences teens’ social media privacy behaviors. Proceedings of the 2015 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW 2015), Vancouver, BC, Canada, March 2015. [Best Paper Honorable Mention]

Sundar, S. S., Bellur, S., Oh, J., Jia, H., Kim, H. (2016). Theoretical importance of contingency in human-computer interaction: Effects of message interactivity on user engagement. Communication Research, 43(5), 596-625.

Sundar, S. S., Jia, H., Waddell, F., & Huang, Y. (2015). Toward a theory of interactive media effects (TIME): Four models for explaining how interface features affect user psychology. In S. S. Sundar (Ed.), The Handbook of Psychology of Communication Technology (pp. 47-86). Malden, MA: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Sundar, S. S., Bellur, S., Oh, J., Xu, Q., & Jia, H. (2014). User experience of on-screen interaction techniques: An experimental investigation of clicking, sliding, zooming, hovering, dragging, and flipping. Human-Computer Interaction, 29(2), 109-152.

Jia, H., Sundar, S. S., Lee, J. Y., & Lee, S. (2014). Is Web 2.0 culture-free or culture-bound? Differences between American and Korean blogs. Proceedings of the 47th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS), IEEE Computer Society Press, 1735-1744.

Jia, H., Wu, M., Jung, E., Shapiro, A., & Sundar, S. S. (2013). When the tissue box says “Bless You”: Designing socially interactive objects and robots with speech. Proceedings of the 2013 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI’13), 1635-1640.

Jia, H., Wu, M., Jung, E., Shapiro, A., & Sundar, S. S. (2012). Balancing human agency and object agency: An in-depth interview study of the Internet of Things. Proceedings of the 2012 ACM Conference on Ubiquitous Computing (Ubicomp’12), 1185-1188.

Sundar, S. S., Bellur, S., & Jia, H. (2012). Motivational technologies: A theoretical framework for designing preventive health applications. In M. Bang & E. L. Ragnemalm (Eds.), Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Persuasive Technology (PERSUASIVE 2012), LNCS 7284, 112-122.

Sundar, S. S., Oh, J., Bellur, S., Jia, H., & Kim, H. S. (2012). Interactivity as self-expression: A field experiment with customization and blogging. Proceedings of the 2012 Annual Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI’12), 395- 404.

© IMRC CAS 2016

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